A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles

Ah brunch, society’s way of justifying lazing about, eating too much, doing too little and marrying salty, sweet and saucy (mimosas anyone?). 

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

Brunch is my favorite meal of the day, but as farm duties kick into full swing, it’s a meal that no longer fits the schedule (not that the Urban Farmer is the 6 am sort by any means). To indulge in brunch while we still could, I whipped up a little celebration of spring to be enjoyed in the mid-morning hours.

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

I first shared this brunch with the fine, fashionable folks at ModCloth, who asked me for some tips on supporting local agriculture, a topic I love to bring to the table! Since not everyone has the luxury of a fine fella who digs in the dirt all day and then comes home with fresh, flavorful greens, I’ll share some of those same tips here too. (This is also a good time to tell you I’m a ginger now!)

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

What’s your favorite part about farmers markets and other local food spaces?

Conversation + flavor. When people plant, grow, and harvest a vegetable, or milk a cow or goat to make cheese, they tend to be very enthusiastic about that product! Whether it be the quirky name of the heirloom seed or the temperament of the baby goats, this dialogue is such a far cry from asking the produce clerk at the grocery store for more details on the fennel. Plus, local purveyors can pick when the produce is ripe, since they aren’t shipping their product across the globe.

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

Do you have any tips on how to get the most out of a farmers market experience?

Shop with your taste buds and an open mind! Many farmers will give out samples, or offer up herbs and fruits to smell. Think of the farmers market like a cooking show challenge. Here’s what is available and flavorful at the moment, now be creative and turn it into tonight’s dinner! Also, don’t be afraid to stick to your food values! Ask the farmers if they grow organically or pesticide-free (even if they aren’t certified, which is often too expensive for small-scale producers). They risk more for their sustainable approach and should be rewarded accordingly.

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

Okay, so you’ve scored big at the farmers market…now what? Any tips for using your finds in a way that minimizes potential food waste?

Wasting less is a huge priority of mine, so much so that I added a “Waste Not, Want Not” category to my blog to share my experiments and pursuits. One of the biggest ways to mitigate food waste is to compost, so at least waste and scraps won’t be taking up space in a landfill, where they present a slew of problems. Some cities pick up compost with trash and recycling, but unfortunately, Pittsburgh is not yet one of those cities.

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

If you don’t have your own yard, talk to a neighbor about sharing a bin or contact the managers of a local community garden to see if you can drop off a bin of approved compostables. Or, talk to my farmer and me!

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

As far as consuming food to waste less, it comes down to kitchen creativity and experimentation! Try a version of my Turnip Chips & Turnip Greens Dip as a way to use the entire vegetable. Use the end cuts of vegetables like carrots and celery to make a Homemade Stock. The homemade version is usually more flavorful, cheaper and healthier than even the organic store-bought varieties. Juicing is a great way to clean out the refrigerator, and there are quick pickling methods that are not intimidating at all.

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

In the spirit of “Waste Not, Want Not,” I shared a recipe for a Rhubarb Simple Syrup with ModCloth readers. Rhubarb is so nostalgic, since my mom was one of the few neighbors who knew what to do with the stalky vegetable when most people thought it was a weed. This Simple Syrup is perfect for easy brunch cocktails or an afternoon homemade soda (just add sparkling water). 

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

Rather than strain and pitch the fruit from the simple syrup infusion, use it to make a sweet and tart topping for waffles, which I made with local cornmeal and fresh, homegrown basil. I topped it off with Rose Water Whipped Cream for a truly fresh, spring flavor.

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

And if you truly want to eat brunch like this part-time farmer, you DRENCH everything in PURE maple syrup! 

A Spring Brunch featuring Rhubarb Simple Syrup, Rhubarb Compote & Cornmeal Basil Waffles // www.WithTheGrains.com

Happy Brunching!

Quelcy Signature

p.s: Be sure to scroll to the bottom to see the #BTS with my trusty sidekick. 
p.p.s: This post was presented in collaboration with ModCloth, but all opinions are my own. 

Whole-Grain, Cornmeal, Basil Belgian Waffles with Strawberry Rhubarb Compote & Rose Water Whipped Cream

Yield: about 5 8-inch Belgian style waffles.

(more…)

5 Comments

Farm Greens & Beans

“Hi, I’d like to place an order for pick up, please.”

Greens and Beans // www.WithTheGrains.com

“Ok, what would you like?”

“Greens and Beans, please.”

Laughter and confusion ensued, as if I had just ordered a dirty joke with all the delivery prowess of Amy Schumer.

“Ohhhhh, you mean ‘Beans & Greens.'”

Isn’t that what I said?

I failed to see the hilarity in my word order reversal, but then again, I’m an outsider, a foreigner, a newbie when it comes to BEANS & Greens. This dish was not a tradition in my family. It was not a weekly staple. We didn’t debate which grandmother’s secret recipe was better, or whether an aunt used enough garlic. No, this is a staple I am adopting from my current city, from Pittsburgh.

Greens and Beans // www.WithTheGrains.com

This rusty, steel town probably adopted this staple from its Italian immigrants, but I can’t say for certain. The only research I have conducted is the occasional sampling at the small Italian bakery/cafe. It’s the one next to the espresso bar, where the old Italian men while away the day with caffeinated banter in broken English and broken Italian, depending on their generation. Like their changing language, recipes arrive on new shores and change, or in my case, they arrive in my kitchen, and I stubbornly cling to my word order- Greens and Beans!

Greens and Beans // www.WithTheGrains.com

As the Urban Farmer began preparing the farm for fall and frost, it was time to admit defeat on certain groundhog-nibbled vegetables and dig up their rows. The cauliflower and broccoli failed to grow beyond small, geometric clusters, but the plants’ leaves were dark, green, broad and impressive. As I uprooted the plants, the frugal, midwesterner in me brainstormed how to salvage the greens. So it was, dear Pittsburghers and Italians, I came to make Farm Greens & Beans, and we ate bacony, garlicky, parmesan accented greens for a week like happy peasants!

Single-Grain

Here’s to hearty greens!
-Quelcy

Farm Greens & Beans

About This Recipe: If you want a more precise Greens & Beans recipe, try this. My version is loose and easily adaptable. The main intention of this recipe is to take advantage of farm greens such as cauliflower leaves. If you’re not a farmer or gardener, you can still adapt this recipe and use the beet greens or turnip greens available in grocery stores with a combination of kale or collards. Either way, it’s a method to use the whole vegetable and not just a root. The quantity of greens is imprecise but easy to navigate. I wanted to make a large pot, so we used 3-4 hearty bunches, and filled a dutch oven with greens.

(more…)

0 Comments

Brown Rice Pasta w/ Garden Vegetable Beef Sauce & Fried Green Tomatoes

“You know what I call this?” the Urban Farmer said while proudly photographing the rickety wooden crate full of fresh-picked vegetables. “A case of the Mondays,” he said beaming with pun pride.

Brown Rice Pasta with Fried Green Tomatoes // www.WithTheGrains.com

He chose another caption for his photo, not wanting to offend those stuck in Monday drudgery. I have often hesitated on sharing a pure joy lest it be regarded as boastful, so I understood his reserve. I’m not sure if this stems from deep-rooted American values or a Christian upbringing or both, but hiding happiness is RIDICULOUS, no?

Brown Rice Pasta with Fried Green Tomatoes // www.WithTheGrains.com

I may be riding the emotional highs of listening to a lot of Elizabeth Gilbert wisdom, but who wouldn’t be happy watching that barefoot boy celebrate his dream farm on a weekly basis? Truth be told, Mondays with the Urban Famer were so far from the Mondays I once knew. On Mondays, man, woman and dog piled into the red truck, picked vegetables in the sun and then delivered them to the supporters who made this year’s farm efforts possible. Why would we hide that happiness from imagined miserable people?

Brown Rice Pasta with Fried Green Tomatoes // www.WithTheGrains.com

Today is the last of these CSA Mondays for this season. There will still be farm work to do- bulbs to plant, invasive trees to cut, flowers varieties to select- but the CSA routine concludes today, just as the foggy, gray, frosty mornings are blanketing the fields. It feels more special than sad, more celebratory than conclusive. This was the beginning, and so much is in store! There is still so much room for expansion, so many lessons to teach, so many lessons to learn, and best of all, there will be so many new dishes to eat!

Brown Rice Pasta with Fried Green Tomatoes // www.WithTheGrains.com

The farm calmed my Mondays, calmed my spirit and inspired new kitchen experiments. Monday after Monday, I combed the fruitful tomato vines in search of the bright reds, burgundies and yellows. Despite the challenging weather, the vines persisted with an inspiring abundance. However, the frost brought a new color spectrum- the greens!

I knew fried green tomatoes from the movie title and perhaps the occasional menu item, but I’d never eaten them or made them. I’m sharing Monday happiness with you in the form of these fried green tomatoes. The recipe is loose, like cooking with my mom and her mother before her. Both women knew to follow their instincts, adding a pinch or heap here and there, so allow your traditions and whims to transform this recipe accordingly.

Single-Grain

Happy Monday!
-Quelcy

(more…)

0 Comments

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream

“My goal in life is to walk around like Pooh Bear, with my ‘paw’ deep in a large crock of honey, savoring the sweetness all day long.”

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

In addition to honey’s sweet appeal, the Urban Farmer’s deeper motives for becoming a beekeeper stem from his passion for the environment. When I first introduced him as a beekeeper in the  Meet a Beekeeper post, he explained his desire to defend the honey bee:

“I started to read more about the negative effects of GMO’s (Genetically Modified Organisms) and monocultures (growing a single crop, for a long time in vast areas, which prevents a diverse, year-round diet for bees and simultaneously depletes soil nutrients). The link between bee colony collapse [bees disappearing] and GMO’s seemed so obvious. Bees are dying, and people act as if it’s a big mystery, but if you look at the flaws of the industrial agricultural system, there’s an easy solution: support local honeybees. I chose to dive in completely and become a beekeeper.”

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

Throughout his fledgling beekeeping efforts, the honey was always off limits for us. He had to reserve the liquid gold for the bees, especially as the colder months approached. However, this year his hives have been flourishing, which meant there was sweetness to be shared. This also meant he was one step closer to his Pooh Bear aspirations! The honey extraction process merited a spotlight! I still have much to learn about bees, so who better to explain this exciting process than the Urban Farmer/the Urban Beekeeper himself!

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

How do you know when it’s time to extract honey?

In our climate in Pennsylvania, we have two major “nectar flows.” This refers to mass blooms of a variety of vegetation. The first nectar flow takes place in early summer, followed by a dearth (a drop in the nectar flow), then again in the early fall when knotweed and golden rod become the major food source for our bees. Generally, beekeepers harvest any excess honey after these flows, making sure to reserve enough honey for the bees to get through the summer dearth and the long winter. During the winter, honey is their only major food source.

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com
The metal bristles help remove wax and release more honey.

How is the honey extracted from the hive? 

The extraction process starts by removing the honey supers from the hive. Supers are smaller hive bodies that are placed on the top of the hive (see diagram). The bees naturally use the larger bottom hive bodies, called brood chambers, to raise their young and store pollen (and some honey too). Instinctually, bees store the honey on top of their young. When the hive has enough honey stores built in the brood chamber, they will start to store honey in the upper supers. At that point, the beekeeper can easily remove the frame of honey with out disturbing hatching eggs.

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com
A stowaway!

This, however, does not make it easy to remove bees from the honey supers to transport them for extraction. Some beekeepers use a leaf blower to persuade the bees from the frames or a tried-and-true process of shaking the bees off the frames and securing them in a box as fast as possible, before the bees rush back to their frames. Either way, it’s not an easy or full-proof procedure, and you might discover some stowaways!

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

 What happens to your hives as the weather becomes colder? 

The bees slow down in the cooler weather. They forage less and then not at all in the dead of winter. The queen slows down egg laying, and the bees go into a mode of trying to heat the hive. They detach their wings and vibrate at such a frequency that they can heat the hive through the negative degrees of winter.

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

When is the best time to start beekeeping? How does one start beekeeping? 

The best time to start a new hive is in early Spring – March or April. Bees are becoming active at that time of year, and they begin the process of regrowing their numbers. Bee packages are available for purchase at this time. This is also the time of year when beekeepers make “splits” (splitting a bee hive into two hives), so it’s a good time to find local bees for sale. If you are interested in starting a bee hive, I highly recommend reaching out to Burgh Bees for information on where to find bees, as well as a listing of courses available through the organization. [Burgh Bees has a lot of helpful resources for non-locals too!]

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

If there’s anything I’ve learned in observing and discussing bees with the Urban Farmer, it’s that beekeeping is a fickle trade. A beekeeper can do everything right, only to discover his bees have fled the hive. Then, sadly, it’s back to the beginning. So when he discovered he could harvest honey from his hives, it was a celebratory moment with an especially sweet reward!

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

Extracting honey made me appreciate the beekeepers who harvest, store and sell large quantities of the honey. It’s sticky work for sure, and as we cranked the machine beekeepers have surely been using for centuries, we had our doubts. Were three frames worth this rigamarole? Would we salvage any honey, or would it all be stuck to the guts of the apparatus? We of little faith! When we turned the release nozzle, the honey flowed and flowed and flowed!

Extracting Honey + Pancakes w/ Honey Roasted Bananas & Cinnamon Whipped Cream // www.WithTheGrains.com

Sometimes my words and my emotions fail to convey my excitement and pride in the moment, so instead, I use my kitchen and my table. I’ve seen up close the ups and downs of tending to the little black and golden creatures. I’ve seen the stings, the swelling and the defeats. However, this pancake brunch was to celebrate the Urban Farmer’s determination, his dedication and nature’s dessert.

Whole Wheat Honey Banana Pancakes with Honey Cinnamon Whipped Cream & Roasted Bananas // www.WithTheGrains.com

Honey sweetened, whole-wheat pancakes with honey & cinnamon whipped cream and topped with honey roasted bananas – this was a pancake brunch ode to honey!

Whole Wheat Honey Banana Pancakes with Honey Cinnamon Whipped Cream & Roasted Bananas // www.WithTheGrains.com

Hopefully the bees’ remaining honey will carry them boldly through winter. Hopefully, the following spring will entice them with its nectar flow, and hopefully, this honey harvesting will become a tradition. For now though, we celebrate each spoonful we have and the progress the Urban Farmer is making on the bee front!

Single-Grain

Sweetly,
Quelcy

Whole Wheat Honey Banana Pancakes
w/ Honey Cinnamon Whipped Cream & Honey Roasted Bananas

Note: Pancakes are a great way to use local milk that has just turned, as well as bananas that are over ripened. I used a soured milk for this pancake recipe, and it yielded an extra fluffy pancake and less waste! As always though, exercise caution when using an ingredient past its peak. Alternately, you can use buttermilk. 

(more…)

0 Comments

A Farewell to Summer and A Recipe for Homemade Ketchup

“You in?” he yelled while already launching me forward.

“And this is how it ends,” I thought. “Death by homemade zip line!”

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

As the very questionable swing rocketed forward, I gripped fiercely and managed to scooch my bum into the very key area- the seat! The smile on my face shifted abruptly to an expression of pure panic as I beelined for the very solid tree directly in front of me. “Does this thing stoppppp?!?” I wanted to yell, but before I could form words, the swing yanked me backward in one jarring, whiplash-inducing motion.

Wooohoo! One more time!

Welcome to the Kunkle Family Reunion, Quelcy!

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

The Kunkles, the Urban Farmer’s family through his mother’s side, are titans of tradition! The family reunion I attended could have been any of the family reunions from the last 50 years. The faces may have aged, and new little Kunkle offshoots may have arrived, but the campsite was the same. The games and challenges were the same, and the spirit of good ol’ family fun was the same.

Knox at Kunkle Reunion

That family fun didn’t include technology either. I didn’t see kids scrolling on phones. I didn’t see iPads or movies. I saw rackets, gloves, tree swings, dogs and kids splashing in the creek, and middle-aged men competing against children with the seriousness of Olympic athletes. In a word, it was comforting.

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

The reunion was especially comforting because beyond the Kunkle family compound, “progress” threatens the beautiful hills, meadows, mountains and streams. Where families once hiked and swam freely, toxins and carcinogens now bar them from their own land. The promises of natural gas proved too good to be true, and the landscape of Western Pennsylvania is changing rapidly. In the name of “progress” so much has already been lost in our region (see these firsthand accounts if you don’t believe me).

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

But these external threats and unraveling traditions made the Kunkle Family Reunion all the more special. Real people. Real connections. Real traditions preserved and passed to the next generation of Reunion Presidents, Vice Presidents and Treasurers. Like a grandmother’s beloved recipe baked by her granddaughter, these ritual handoffs deserve to be celebrated. So, without further ado, I bring you this glimpse into the past, and why it stuck with me.

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

The legendary Kunkle Reunion Base Race kicked off the events of the day. The competitive nature of this event quickly became apparent when the historical scoreboards came into sight. The discolored boards of the 80s marked the key year when the bases were moved, lest any performance be judged unfairly by the distance differential. It was also worth noting that Mike Shoop’s slowest time was the result of a knee injury, not a lack of athletic ability.

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

Julep and I watched with pride, awe and maybe even a heart flutter or two as the Urban Farmer dug deep and delivered the overall winning base race score of 9.3 seconds, a far cry from his score of 39.1 seconds in 1986!

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

“Quelcy Kogel to the plate,” the man in suspenders announced. “Oh no…no, no…no,” I objected, but all eyes were on me. I had come merely to watch, but the Urban Farmer had thrown my hat in the ring. He had entered my name without my knowing!

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

My palms were sweaty, my heart was racing, and off I went! Every competitive nerve in my body was tingling.

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

I fell short of my main squeeze, so don’t be surprised if you sporadically find me running bases in the off season. Next year, I’ll be prepared, but I sincerely hope the official time-keeping uniform never changes!

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

Young and old kept the tradition alive, and after such exerting work, it was time for swimming in the creek, which first requires jumping from a rope swing (and requires leaving cameras safely on dry land).

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

As happily overwhelmed as I was, my Julep was overwhelmed in a way that gave us all quite a scare. Between the other dogs, the commotion, the anxiety of watching her papa tethered to another human and teetering in a three-legged race, the poor little one overdid it. As the Urban Farmer and I held her close and tried to decipher what exactly was causing her to drool, pant and tremble excessively, so many family members came to our side.

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

Family members who I barely knew rallied to offer any help they could. Closer family members overlooked dog drool and wet fur to help us ice down and comfort our poor dehydrated fur baby. They showed such sincere concern for our Julep, and I’ll never forget it.

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

I had come simply to observe and relish the Kunkles’ traditions, but in the end, I felt so connected to the Urban Farmer’s family. As our Julep rehydrated, refueled and showed signs of her normal self, the rest of the reunion adjourned to the campfire for silly songs,  s’mores and the rest of the evening’s time-tested agenda. Though we left early, the day left me with a lasting impression.

A Farewell to Summer // www.WithTheGrains.com

The Urban Farmer, like his family’s reunion, borrows from the past in an effort to preserve tradition. He worked tirelessly this year, through rainy spells, dry spells and rampant groundhog spells to stay true to his farming convictions. He believes in tighter ties to our food, and more connections with the makers and growers. He believes in a self-sustaining local system, and he won’t stop until he achieves it.

Homemade Ketchup Recipe // www.WithTheGrains.com

As the autumn settles upon his farm, the tomato vines have given one last burst of bright red fruits. Like base races, old truck rides and creek swims, summer tomatoes are worth preserving.

Homemade Ketchup Recipe // www.WithTheGrains.com

In an effort to truly preserve the flavors and the spirit of summer, I returned to America’s classic condiment- ketchup!

Homemade Ketchup Recipe // www.WithTheGrains.com

As a Pittsburgh resident, it may be blasphemy to offer an alternative to the beloved Heinz 57, but I find it blasphemous to masquerade high fructose corn syrup as an American tradition (though sadly, it is becoming an American tradition).

Homemade Ketchup Recipe // www.WithTheGrains.com

This homemade ketchup won’t boast the exact ruby redness or perfectly smooth texture of store-bought counterparts, but each dollop of this condiment will impress. Make your own ketchup, and every winter burger or oven roasted french fry will become more satisfying and take you back to summer grilling and tomato harvesting in the heat. There’s something to be said for preservation!

Single-Grain

Here’s to traditions, memories and delicious condiments!
-Quelcy

(more…)

3 Comments
Close Menu
%d bloggers like this: