A Hindu Temple, An Indian Inspired Picnic & A Curry Roasted Potato Salad

May 2015

Wanderlust can be an excuse sometimes. In dreaming of distant adventures, foreign tongues and exotic foods, it can be all too easy to overlook the finer details of what’s close to home. In lamenting a lacking budget, it can be all too easy to feel lost in day-to-day routines and to visit the same old haunts. I’ve been guilty of this. Life is full of trade-offs, and when I took some creative leaps and financial risks, my passport began to collect dust, and I began to collect excuses.

Hindu Temple // www.WithTheGrains.com

My rootedness made my head spin, questioning if I were on the right path, if there were a light at the end of this tunnel, etc (i.e.: I should probably just take a yoga class and exhale these anxieties away). But wanderlust doesn’t come with a mileage requirement. I had failed to plan. I had failed to explore. I had failed to wander within my means, so I decided to cut through my own bullshit. Luckily, I had friends right there with me.

Hindu Temple and Picnic by With The Grains-12

I tried to approach my city and my region like a complete outsider, and like a clipboard-toting cruise director, I made a list, with headers, bullet points and links. I tried to recall all the “Oh! What’s that? We should go there!” moments and let Google fill in the gaps. One such place to make the list was the Sri Venkateswara Temple.

Hindu Temple // www.WithTheGrains.com

Perched atop a hill, this Hindu temple is visible from a busy Pittsburgh highway, but no matter how many times I’ve traveled that route, the temple has always shocked me. It was as if my eyes were playing tricks on me, as if an acre of India had somehow dropped onto available real estate in Western Pennsylvania. I had traveled past the temple so many times, it was high time to explore it!

Hindu Temple // www.WithTheGrains.com

With very little understanding of the visiting procedures, we made our way to the beacon of white, and much like the observation required of traveling abroad, we had to look, listen and imitate so as not to offend or overstep our boundaries. Photography isn’t permitted inside the temple, so I had to look and listen all the more.

Hindu Temple // www.WithTheGrains.com

When I stepped into the temple, the coolness of the floor hit my bare feet, the bright white of all the details radiated light, and I felt this immediate calm. Guided by the layout, we unknowingly performed the ritual circumambulation. The priests’ chants formed a relaxing background as we watched the rituals unfold. My friends and I sat close to one another, silently appreciating the sacredness all around us, and then we worked up the nerve to join an Archana in a shrine.

Hindu Temple // www.WithTheGrains.com

The priest walked with a lit flame on a silver lantern/urn of sorts, and we cupped the smoke toward our faces, followed by a turmeric-dyed water and another silver urn placed quickly and gently on our heads. We didn’t understand the significance, as the ritual all happened in what I assume was Hindi, but the process was very humbling and quieting.

Hindu Temple // www.WithTheGrains.com

Walking through the temple and joining the rituals made us appreciate the more philosophical elements of religion and the more universal messages- clear your mind, clear your heart, humble yourself, be present, be the light. I recalled a similar feeling when I sat in a Parisian Catholic church to escape the rain. I spoke French well enough to understand the priest, but if I let my mind drift, the verses were simply beautiful sounds strung together. There was something about the architecture and the ritual that combined to stir my emotions in a profound way. Some might attribute that feeling to a deity, but I prefer to linger in the agnostic and cull together the attributes that touch me the most.

Hindu Temple // www.WithTheGrains.com

With a new level of calm, we departed, found a park and enjoyed an Indian inspired picnic.

Indian Inspired Picnic // www.WithTheGrains.com

I often explore the way a journey inspires a recipe, but this day-trip and picnic were an example of a recipe inspiring a journey. I had received a packet of Rose & Chai spices in my RawSpiceBar subscription, which arrives like a souvenir, with stories, recipes and even a patterned paper from the spice’s land of origin. Receiving the package in the mail feels like a ritual unto itself, so I wanted to share the food in a special way as well. Knowing I was going to bake these Chai & Rose Nankhatai Cookies was the impetus for visiting the temple at long last. 

Indian Inspired Picnic // www.WithTheGrains.com

I might never have thought to have an Indian inspired picnic if it weren’t for my little elephant chai cookies, but the menu turned out to be perfect picnic food so much so we coined the term piknir.

Indian Inspired Picnic // www.WithTheGrains.com

Nina packed several traditional Indian dishes in her authentic, stackable Indian lunch tin and paired them with a few varieties of naan. Kara provided the iced chai and fresh mango. Didi provided chutneys and the mint & fennel combination Indian restaurants serve after a meal. I added the chai cookies and a curry roasted sweet potato salad.

Indian Inspired Picnic // www.WithTheGrains.com

In a tribute to the spiritual calm we felt from the temple, we made our own picnic basket shrine to Ganesha, complete with the bananas we received after completing the Archana. Ganesha is widely revered as the remover of obstacles, so we shared our individual obstacles. These topics may never have emerged on a typical picnic, but sharing these vulnerabilities was really comforting and inspiring. We were able to hear each other, to relate, and to boost each other as well, and that may never have happened if it weren’t for a cookie recipe!

Indian Inspired Picnic // www.WithTheGrains.com

Here’s to cutting through our bullshit. Here’s to exploring. Here’s to observing. Here’s to gleaning the philosophies that make us better beings, and here’s to cookie inspired journeys!

Single-Grain

Namaste!
-Quelcy

Curry Roasted Potato Salad for an Indian Inspired Picnic

About This Recipe: Be loose with this recipe! It should come together fluidly, tasting as you go and trusting your spice instincts. The addition of greens means you take in more veggies than a traditional picnic potato salad. I suggest kale or a heartier green for texture. I added hemp hearts for a slight crunch. They’re available at Trader Joe’s, but if you can’t find them, you can substitute flax or the chopped nut of your choice. I spiced my version heavily with turmeric, which adds a mild, warm, peppery flavor but a bright color and a variety of health benefits.

Curry Roasted Purple Potato Salad
yield: 8-10 servings

Ingredients

1/4 cup organic avocado oil (or melted coconut oil), plus more for pan
1 large, organic sweet potato, chopped
20 small, organic purple potatoes, cut in fourths
2 teaspoons fresh grated ginger
3 Tablespoons curry powder, or to taste
3 Tablespoons turmeric, or to taste
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

6 hardboiled eggs (organic/cage-free), shelled & chopped
1/2 – 1 cup homemade mayonnaise (or organic store-bought), depending how creamy you want it

organic kale, or other greens such as spinach, to taste
raw, shelled hemp seeds or flax seeds, to taste

Directions

Preheat oven to 425℉. Grease a large, rectangular baking sheet with oil.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the chopped sweet potatoes, purple potatoes and ginger. Sprinkle with curry powder, turmeric and cayenne, to taste. Add the avocado oil, and toss to coat.

Spread the potato mixture on the baking sheet, then place in the oven. Roast for 30-40 minutes, until the edges begin to crisp, stirring halfway through.

Remove from oven, and let the potatoes cool.

Transfer roasted potatoes to a mixing bowl. Add the hardboiled egg and mayonnaise, stirring until well combined. Add more of the spices if the curry flavor is not strong enough.

Combine with fresh greens, and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Keep chilled until ready to serve.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

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