Chai Tea Concentrate for Lattes & Cocktails // www.WithTheGrains.com

Chai Tea Concentrate for Lattes & Cocktails

It PAINS me to admit I have a Starbucks drink because it pains me to wait in line at Starbucks and listen to “half caff” and “macchiato” and “frappuccino,”- syrupy abominations I could stomach if the coffee weren’t so over roasted and unpalatable. Admittedly, I am what you call a coffee/coffeeshop snob. (Before you condemn me completely, I’m not alone in thinking their drinks are obnoxious.) I have principles and rules, and no matter how much I like it, I just can’t bring myself to revel in Starbuck’s stronghold on Tazo Chai unless I am:

  1. At an airport
  2. At a rest stop

I am neither of those right now.

Chai Tea Concentrate for Lattes & Cocktails // www.WithTheGrains.com

But I am resourceful! My final nudge to satisfy my chai cravings with a homemade solution came after styling the “Big Batch” article for TABLE Magazine. The article, by Jessica Server, also featured recipes for making a big batch of soup and a pancake mix. High yield recipes not only simplify weeknight menu planning, but these consolidated efforts lend themselves to my passion- entertaining.

Chai Tea Concentrate for Lattes & Cocktails // www.WithTheGrains.com

Stretching out these more intensive kitchen efforts yields more gatherings with less stress. Without having to start from scratch for each party, there’s more time to focus on other obsessive details without devolving into Mr. Hyde before guests arrive.

Chai Tea Concentrate for Lattes & Cocktails // www.WithTheGrains.com

Homemade chai concentrate not only saves me from Starbucks, but this recipe offers more opportunities to welcome friends into my home. If a big batch of chai doesn’t inspire you to host a variety of gatherings, keep reading. I’ve thought about this for you.

Chai Tea Concentrate for Lattes & Cocktails // www.WithTheGrains.com

Invite a friend over for some quality one-on-one time. Serve a pot of chai and delicacies from your favorite French bakery, or bake this apricot breakfast pastry. Make an even bigger pot of chai and warm a whole table of brunch guests with all the comforting spices. After dark, offer guests a chance to concoct their own gingerbread inspired cocktail with my favorite Snap liquor. For an even fuller bar, offer spiced rum and whiskey options too.

Chai Tea Concentrate for Lattes & Cocktails // www.WithTheGrains.com

If I seem a tad obsessive about these “Big Batch” ideas, it’s partially because I am obsessive and partially because I spoke about them in front of a live audience! For a few more of my ideas on Big Batch entertaining and styling, check out this video from my spot on Pittsburgh Today Live with TABLE Magazine:

Happy Sipping!

Quelcy Signature

Chai Tea Concentrate for Lattes & Cocktails
Recipe adapted from the graphic food memoir Relish: My Life in the Kitchen by Lucy Knisley 

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How To Use Leftover Ganache: Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Brownies (gluten free) // www.WithTheGrains.com

How To Use Leftover Ganache: Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Brownies (gluten free)

David lifted Didi into the air, and her satiny blue skirt’s ruffles erupted like a firework beneath his grip. They were now husband and wife, and this dance floor embrace was the moment I wanted to preserve in my memory- nothing but satin, lace and love! In the same weekend, a mere bridge away, I watched Chris and Dana embrace their 10-lb bundle of puppy joy, feeling the slipper like warmth of her fur brush against their ridiculously happy, tired faces.

How To Use Leftover Ganache: Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Brownies (gluten free) // www.WithTheGrains.com

These satin, lace, and puppy joys emerged from times of illnesses, deaths and heartaches, which only heightened these highs. In its ebbs and flows, this life can feel like one big sine curve- an alternating act of “all” or “nothing.” My kitchen corroborates these intense swings- the oven will warm, churning out fancy cake after fancy cake, for back-to-back birthdays, dinner parties and holiday gatherings, followed by the cold oven periods and slim pickings.

How To Use Leftover Ganache: Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Brownies (gluten free) // www.WithTheGrains.com

During the “all” times, we swim in desserts. The refrigerator bursts with an odd assortment of frostings, fillings and cake scraps, and even my intense sweet tooth feels overwhelmed. I give desserts away right and left, but shamefully, I’ve yet to hit the sweet spot of zero waste, and of all the morsels to hit the compost bin, dark chocolate pains my sensibilities the most.

How To Use Leftover Ganache: Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Brownies (gluten free) // www.WithTheGrains.com

In fear of a half-frosted cake, I always seem to make too much chocolate ganache- a good problem in the chocolate sense, a bad problem when it ends up as compost. As I whipped up a mid-week dessert-craving cure- my trusty nut butter blondies– I eyed the leftover ganache in the refrigerator. Sure, it could be frozen and maybe be enough for the next cake, but in the end, I’d probably end up stuck in a leftover cycle. Wanting an immediate solution, I broke off chunks of the pliable chocolate and stirred it directly into the batter. Out came an even better blondie- a brownie.

I’m still figuring out how to extend the grin-until-your-jaw-hurts moments through the sadder/stressful swings, but in the meantime, at least I am finding more ways to stretch dessert abundances more and waste less. What are your tricks?

Quelcy Signature

Dark Chocolate Almond Butter Brownies (Gluten Free)
yield: 9×13 pan

About this Recipe: If you have leftover ganache after baking a cake, save it for these brownies. If you don’t have ganache to add, simply omit it and follow the rest of this recipe to make my go-to blondies. I used approximately 1 cup of soft ganache (not liquid), but as a chocolate lover, I imagine the more, the better, so experiment! Continue reading

Recipe Roundup for a Chestnut Menu

When it comes to menu planning, I like to weave an ingredient through each course. In this way, I explore its nuances as well as challenge myself to use that food in unsuspecting ways lest my guests feel like they are eating gruel. For this wintry meal, I dove into chestnuts, and I even incorporated them into the loose, wintry pine garland on the dinner table.

Chestnut Recipe Roundup by With The Grains 01

A Chestnut Themed Menu

Creamy Chestnut Mushroom Soup (Vegetarian)
Roasted Chestnut & Herb Stuffing (Vegetarian)
Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Cream & Dark Chocolate Ganache

Bon Appétit!Quelcy Signature

Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Cream & Dark Chocolate Ganache // www.WithTheGrains.com

Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Cream & Dark Chocolate Ganache

While waiting with unreasonable anticipation for Fuller House to hit our streaming channels, the Urban Farmer and I have nestled into Mozart in the Jungle. It’s over-the-top in its portrayal of a free spirit, the “chemistry” feels forced, and if I hear Lola Kirke giggle impishly one more time, I might be forced to call it quits on this binge effort. Yet somehow watching Gael García Bernal with hippy hair is enough to merit the lost winter hours, and critiques aside, the show did leave me with one golden nugget.

Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Cream & Dark Chocolate Ganache // www.WithTheGrains.com

The prodigy conductor, Rodrigo (Bernal) encourages the symphony director (Bernadette Peters) to sing publicly. After she dismisses her vocal talents as “amateur,” he admonishes, “You say that as if it was a dirty word or something, but ‘amateur’ comes from the Latin word amare, which means love- to do things for the love of it.” In a show about an orchestra, this, my friends, provided the most music to my ears!

Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Cream & Dark Chocolate Ganache // www.WithTheGrains.com

Most of my early to mid-twenties were filled with a crippling doubt as I tried to pinpoint my passion, my purpose, my place on this massive spinning globe, etc- that typical cocktail of honor roll meets intense university collides with real world. I felt an immense pressure to find and stick to something with the devoutness of a nun. As the rocks gradually diluted that stress cocktail, I began to embrace this fact about myself- I don’t want to be an expert.

Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Cream & Dark Chocolate Ganache // www.WithTheGrains.com

I don’t want to be an expert. I don’t have one single passion. I do not seek precision. I want to bake, but I don’t want to understand every single chemical reaction and perfect every process. I don’t want to repeat recipes. I want to be a photographer, but I don’t want to invest in lighting and elaborate setups. I want to draw and silkscreen and play with flowers, and restoring the passion within the word “amateur” frees so much pressure from these activities.

Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Cream & Dark Chocolate Ganache // www.WithTheGrains.com

So be an amateur cook and make horrible mistakes. Buy a camera, take pictures, take ugly pictures and keep taking pictures! Be an amateur baker, and share your layers of cake with those around you. Some of the best recipes come from amateurs- the grandmothers, mothers and dads who vaguely followed instructions, heaped spoonfuls, threw ingredients together and made it work because their hearts were in it.

Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Cream & Dark Chocolate Ganache // www.WithTheGrains.com

Fittingly, this recipe was adapted from my new favorite read, Sift Magazine, which I can’t stop raving about (no, they are not sponsoring my fanaticism- I wish!). Its beautiful pages are all about celebrating the love of baking, in other words, they celebrate the amateurs!

Quelcy Signature

p.s: If juggling multiple passions and curiosities rings a bell, I recommend this TED Talk for more inspiration- “Why Some of Us Don’t Have One True Calling

Whole Wheat Chocolate Layer Cake with Chestnut Filling & Dark Chocolate Ganache
Recipe adapted from Sift Magazine (Holiday 2015)/King Arthur Flour

About This Recipe: You’ll need a large sheet pan (18”x13”) to bake this spongey, chocolate cake, which is then simply cut into fourths and stacked with layers of delicious chestnut cream as a filler. I found chestnut cream at Whole Foods, as well as my local grocery chain, but if you can’t find it, you can substitute Nutella for the filling. 

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Roasted Chestnut Stuffing (Vegetarian) // www.WithTheGrains.com

Roasted Chestnut Stuffing (Vegetarian)

“How do you feel about chestnuts?” I asked Jill, who was coming for dinner in a few days.

“Like…I like them roasting over an open fire? I actually have no idea!”

Though we sing about chestnuts roasting every year, and the lyrics help put us in that holiday spirit, how many of us actually eat these hearty nuts?

Roasted Chestnut Stuffing (Vegetarian) // www.WithTheGrains.com

If my friend Jill, who samples an array of precise recipes daily at America’s Test Kitchen, cooks constantly, travels extensively and meets world class chefs as part of her job…if she had never eaten a chestnut, it’s safe to say very few people are eating these nuts. This begs the question, why do we sing nostalgically about this nut but not eat it?

Roasted Chestnut Stuffing (Vegetarian) // www.WithTheGrains.com

The short answer is blight. Once upon a time, chestnut trees blanketed the east coast of the United States, covering some 200 million acres. Frost resistant and reliable, the tree was a major source of income for many a rural community, both as a source of food for livestock and as a timber source. However, in the first half of the twentieth century, blight, imported through Asian Chestnut Trees, devastated the eastern woodlands. If this feels like a dismal tale from the annals of food history, it is, BUT there’s a glimmer of hope too!

Roasted Chestnut Stuffing (Vegetarian) // www.WithTheGrains.com

Fortunately, there are organizations and people working to restore the chestnut’s mighty presence. These history lessons are also valuable as more and more of us seek to improve the local food economy. If we spend more time examining our food and its sources, we can better mediate our local agricultural systems. For now, chestnuts cost a pretty penny in grocery stores, and their availability is limited (I hope you can still acquire some as I am sharing this in January!), but hopefully, in the not-too-distant future, every east coast grocery store will offer a regular bin of local chestnuts. Maybe I’ll even be gathering them at Hazelwood Urban Farms!

Here’s to chestnuts roasting on lots of open fires!

Quelcy Signature

Roasted Chestnut Stuffing/Dressing
Recipe adapted from Sift magazine
Yield: 10 servings

About This Recipe: Vegetarians and carnivores can unite on this classic side dish thanks to chestnuts’ meaty flavor! For a more nutrient rich approach, I used a combination of Whole Wheat Sourdough and Mt. Athos Fire Bread (a local favorite- sub any dense, grainy bread). This recipe calls for baking the bread cubes to dry them, but you can also cube and save bread as it starts to harden to avoid wasting a loaf. To simplify the recipe, you can use pre-cooked chestnuts (like these), but roasting draws a lot of flavor. If you have more than 1 1/2 cups chestnuts after roasting and shelling, add them to the stuffing. That quantity is flexible. 

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Chestnut Soup by With The Grains 01

Creamy Chestnut & Mushroom Soup (Vegetarian)

With the phrases “winter weather watch” and “storm advisory” hanging heavy in the air, the grocery stores teeter on the brink of milk, egg and bread depletion. Though I’d advocate for a fair fight for the last crusty loaf, I have this creamy, vegetarian, snowstorm survival idea to offer you: Chestnut Mushroom Soup!

Creamy Chestnut & Mushroom Soup (Vegetarian) // www.WithTheGrains.com

In a world of titles and categories, I lump myself with the “conscientious omnivores,” but chestnuts could nearly sway me to the vegetarian crowd. Spoonful after warm spoonful, the roasted chestnuts could easily fool you into believing meat lurked in this creamy soup.

Creamy Chestnut & Mushroom Soup (Vegetarian) // www.WithTheGrains.com

So hit the grocery store, fight for the last crusty loaf of bread, and while the milk and eggs create a diversion, scrounge that lingering holiday offering of chestnuts. Then, cozy into the weekend with a big batch of hearty, vegetarian soup.

Creamy Chestnut & Mushroom Soup (Vegetarian) // www.WithTheGrains.com

Bon Appétit!

Quelcy Signature

Chestnut Mushroom Soup (Vegetarian)
Recipe adapted from Martha Stewart
makes 12 servings

About This Recipe: The process of roasting and shelling chestnuts can be a bit tedious, but the end result is worth the experience! Hearty and meaty, this vegetarian soup pairs well with buttery brie on dense, whole grain bread. For a vegan option, use coconut oil for the sautéing, and garnish with a whipped coconut cream. 

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Chestnut Dinner by With The Grains 01

A Winter Meal & A Chestnut Menu

Long, dramatic tapers have a way of gauging the gatherings they illuminate.

A Winter Meal & A Chestnut Menu // www.WithTheGrains.com

Fresh from the box, they stand tall, almost precariously so, but if the conversation flows, the laughs bellow and the wine bottles empty, they diminish into waxy dribbles and safer, stubbier forms. The candles, far more subtle than a ticking clock, have a gentle way of saying, “you’ve conversed long into the evening. Your eyes are tired, but your hearts and stomaches are full!” Whereas the clock may say, “it’s too late,” the candles say, “it’s still bright enough for dessert!”

A Winter Meal & A Chestnut Menu // www.WithTheGrains.com

These elegant black tapers illuminated a Chestnut Themed Menu for a wintry meal with The Urban Farmer and my friend Jill. They burned long into the night, from Chestnut & Mushroom soup with crusty bread, to Chestnut Stuffing and finally, to a layered Chestnut Chocolate Cake. Stay tuned for the recipes & menu recap, and in the meantime, I hope your tapers burn low.

Quelcy Signature

 

Homemade Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric // www.WithTheGrains.com

Homemade Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric

The “Whole Body” section at Whole Foods sees a significant spike in sales about 1-2 weeks into January. Can you guess why?

Homemade Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric // www.WithTheGrains.com

This is about the time a person realizes his or her symptoms are no longer the effects of a well celebrated New Year and are, in fact, the start of a cold or flu. Since all I was hitting on New Year’s Eve was tea (admittedly lame), I was faster to recognize the softball in my throat as an ailment and not the consequence of celebration.

Homemade Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric // www.WithTheGrains.com

“Hippy” inclinations aside, I’ve long thought cough medicine was a form of syrupy, grape TORTURE. Why add suffering on top of suffering? Instead, I turn to nature for remedies I actually want to drink.

Homemade Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric // www.WithTheGrains.com

Landing somewhere between a soothing vegetable broth and Tang (in a good way!), this herbal tea’s ingredients unfold as you sip- a hit of ginger here, a faint kick of garlic there, a tart pucker of lemon and the sweetness of raw honey.

Homemade Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric // www.WithTheGrains.com

Homemade Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric // www.WithTheGrains.com

Whether not there’s a softball in your throat, this tea is a healthy way to start the morning or sip while cozily escaping the winter just beyond your window.

Homemade Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric // www.WithTheGrains.com

Sip and be well!

Quelcy Signature

Herbal Cough Suppressant with Lemon & Turmeric
Recipe from Bon Appétit
Yield: Makes about 8 cups

About This Recipe: Imagine a cross between broth and the Tang from your childhood, in a good way, and you have this homemade elixir. Smooth and flavorful enough to drink even when your throat is in tip-top shape. Be careful not to boil the tea. It will give you a cleaner flavor and be more nutrient-rich.

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Heinz History Center by With The Grains 18

WWII “We Can Do It” + @WQED Chris Fennimore’s Cooking Demo

One of my biggest fears in life is being interviewed about American history by some secret talk show reporter (I know- first world fears). Like the fools unveiled on Letterman or Leno, I’d stammer, make up answers and reveal an overwhelming lack of knowledge (at least I can identify Mount Rushmore- c’mon!).

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

The exhibit begins with a typical Pittsburgh living room from WWII.

I was fortunate to have really motivated, inspiring high school teachers, but cramming six years of complex WWII history into one lesson plan leaves a lot to be desired. Very little comes to life in such a consolidated academic approach, so mine became a position of apathy. Hence I first ignored the Heinz History Center’s WWII “We Can Do It”, brushing it aside with “I’m not interested in war.” Then I saw a listing for “WWII Cooking with Chris Fennimore,” and my curiosity was piqued!

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

By 1933, nearly 15 million Americans had lost their jobs. In Pittsburgh, Father James Cox of St. Patrick’s Church in the Strip District organized bread drives and clothing donations. This book documented bread donations to those in need.

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

That’s how I found myself diving excitedly into a WWII exhibit. Unlike a high-school class, the History Center has the ability follow smaller threads and more personal stories. The Heinz exhibit focused on how Pittsburgh affected the war and vice versa. Who knew the rugged, war-tested Jeep was a Pittsburgh/Western PA contribution? I didn’t even know Rosie, the beloved, iconic Riveter, was born right here in this steel city!

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

Beyond war strategies and alliances, the exhibit brought the home life to the forefront. WWII era America was progressive, with women filling traditional male roles such as mechanics, ground crew and security at the local airport. Women soared in WWII, yet 75 years later, we are still fighting for workplace equality.

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

Viewed through the lens of food justice today, America’s local food scene was also quite advanced in the war era. In the face of constricted food channels and the resulting rations, families and communities rallied in “Victory Gardens.” During World War II, these rural and urban gardens provided nearly 40 percent of the vegetables consumed in the U.S. The government elevated gardening to a civic duty through patriotic posters and campaigns.

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

Americans used imported foods in extreme moderation. One recipe advised waiting until several sugar rations could be compiled before baking the cake. After the war, however, the gardens were no longer necessary for sustenance, and urban developers excluded them from their plans. Advancements in refrigeration and transportation filled bright, shiny supermarkets with year-round produce, leading to the onslaught of overly processed foods and the associated health and environmental risks we face today.

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

Nearly 7,000 dog tags hang from the ceiling. Each one represents 200 Pennsylvanians who served during WWII. Each one also represents five who gave their lives.

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

Walking through the exhibit with curator Leslie Przybylek and cooking show host Chris Fennimore provided a mix of history and nostalgia. Fennimore’s father was a vet, and though he was often tight-lipped about his experience, he would often revel in certain foods, outright refuse other foods and delight in WWII supplies reborn as camping gear.

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

WQED Cooking Show Host Chris Fennimore demonstrating a WWII inspired recipe for Corned Beef Hash.

Fennimore brought even more life to the exhibit through the History Center’s test kitchen. He managed to strike a balance of historical accuracy and edibility, no easy task considering the canned meats, fat alternatives and overall scarcity of the era. He even managed to source a can of corned beef from a supermarket- a true vestige of WWII, with a key can-opener and all!

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

Since meat rations were especially lean, home cooks had to find ways to stretch the flavor of meat and fat. Channeling that necessity, Fennimore fried onions, peppers and finely chopped potatoes to create an affordable, flavorful, meaty hash. His cooking demo marked the first and hopefully the last time I will ever eat meat from a can, but questionable meat sourcing aside, the dish merited a second helping!

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

While cooking, Fennimore chatted about the reason he started his show. Much like my own motives for starting a blog, he began cooking on television to celebrate the nostalgia surrounding recipes and meals.

WWII "We Can Do It" + @WQED Chris Fennimore's Cooking Demo // www.WithTheGrains.com

I highly encourage a visit to the museum for the “We Can Do It” exhibit (hurry, it closes January 10th). Beyond history books and academic lessons, the center provides several lenses through which to view this significant event. Perhaps like me, you’ll find new threads to spark your curiosity. For instance, now I’m wondering: When did dog food become a store-bought commodity? Why did jello become such a staple? Why did women disappear from the work force and have to fight so hard to prove themselves again?

Though Chris Fennimore’s cooking demo was a one-night treat, stay tuned as he’ll likely return to the History Center’s kitchen for the next exhibit- Toys From The 1950s.

Happy History Trails, my friends!

Quelcy Signature

Disclaimer: I did receive free admission to the event, but all opinions are my own!

 

 

 

With The Grains Year in Review

A Year With The Grains / Farewell 2015

Much like brushing your teeth after eating a grapefruit, a lingering sour mood can make it hard to get the fresh start you desired. This was the case for my New Year’s Eve- a cranky and sad mood discolored my view of an entire year. I felt ready to kick 2015 to the curb, but why? Had it been that bad?

Not at all! In an effort to give the year a proper send off and change my mood, I nestled into the corner of my neighborhood coffeeshop. Over coffee and a croissant, I dove into this space, With The Grains, this corner of the web where I track my life, my loves, and my curiosities through sharing food.

What I saw was a year steeped heavily in the seasons, playful outbursts and some momentous occasions like baking a child’s very first birthday cake. I reveled in the progress of The Urban Farmer, my first ever cooking demo, breakfast with [Bronx] Obama, picnics on a houseboat, my faithful kitchen companion, meeting inspiring food leaders, and overall, a body of work that made me really proud.

In the coming year, my goal is to stop and relish this journal monthly, take better stock of my life, cherish each day and try my hardest to slow the tempest of time. If you followed With The Grains, left comments regularly, or made these recipes, I thank you for the extra life you’ve brought to my corner of the web!

Farewell 2015, you were a warm oven, a fresh donut and a piping hot cup of coffee!

Quelcy Signature